Philips Avance High-Speed Vacuum Blender HR3752 Review

The Philips Avance High-Speed Vacuum Blender HR3752 provides better coloured and less frothy drinks and soups. It has a quality build and is pretty easy to clean. But the vacuum has some limitations – mainly, no hot liquids and no dry ingredients on their own. Ice-crushing is very powerful, but the pulse function seems to lack the oomph to chop things effectively. This Philips Avance High-Speed Vacuum Blender HR3752 removes air from the jug before blending, which Philips claims leads to tastier, more nutrient-rich drinks. I found this difficult to prove in my tests, but the drinks made definitely had fewer bubbles, which tend to be a common side-effect of high-speed blending. I also noticed a slight improvement in colour – likely a result of less oxidisation. But contrary to some high-end blenders that come with optional vacuum accessories, such as the Vac Q for the Sage Q blender range, you can only use the HR3752 blender in vacuum blending, pulse or ice-crushing mode. The vacuum environment isn’t suitable for ingredients over 40°C or dry mixtures, so it slightly limits your blending options. The HR3752’s lid comprises two parts: a main black plastic lid plus a metallic and pla...

Imagine a settlement where people with different skills live close together and contribute to the community’s

Imagine a settlement where people with different skills live close together and contribute to the community’s overall success: there are farmers who produce food, artisans who process the food, people who consume the food and others who remove waste. They cannot function in isolation relying on each other for survival. Together they are strong and thrive. “In many ways, a mixed microbial community is like a human settlement,” says Dr Rob Huddy, a molecular biologist, inventor and researcher at the Centre for Bioprocess Engineering Research (CeBER) in the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Future Water Institute at the University of Cape Town (UCT). “As a molecular biologist, I am fascinated by how we can manipulate and harness microorganisms to do something useful. “When we put microscopic organisms into a system, and grow them, they have the potential to produce value. For example, microorganisms are used commercially to make cheese, wine and pharmaceuticals. “They can also be used to treat contaminated wastewater produced by industries such as mining, which is a key focus of my research at CeBER.”   Huddy recently gave a talk on ‘Wastewater Bioremediation: Turning Poll...